White

Yellow

Green Tip

Green

Blue Tip

Blue

Brown Tip

Brown

Red Tip

Red

Cho Dan Bo

First Degree

Second Degree

Meaning of Tae Kwon Do

  • TAE: Feet, smashing with kicking techniques
  • KWON: Fist, smashing with hand techniques
  • DO: “Art of”
  • Putting this together, Tae Kwon Do is the self defense martial art, which uses both hand and foot techniques, and which originated in Korea.

Tenets of Tae Kwon Do

  1. YAE YIE (Courtesy)
  2. YUM CHEE (Integrity)
  3. INN NAE (Perseverance)
  4. KOOK KEE (Self-control)
  5. BACK JOL BOOL KOOL (Indomitable spirit)

The True Student

  1. Loyalty to the school and instructor
  2. Good martial art attitude
  3. Student harmony
  4. Good attendance
  5. Clean technique

My Pledge

  1. I will observe the principles of Tae Kwon Do.
  2. I will respect the instructor and all senior ranks.
  3. I will never misuse Tae Kwon Do.
  4. I will be a champion of freedom.
  5. I will build a more peaceful world.

Key Korean Phrases

  • An Young Ha Shim Neeka – How are you
  • Kamsa Ham Ni Da – Thank You
  • Sa Bum Nim – Master
  • Bu Sa Bum Nim – Instructor
  • Jo Kyo Nim – Assistant Instructor
  • You Dan Ja Nim – Black Belt
  • Bumonym – Parents
  • An Young E K Ship Sheeo – Goodbye

Korean Numbers

  • Ha Na – One
  • Dool – Two
  • Set – Three
  • Net – Four
  • Da Sot – Five
  • Yo Sot – Six
  • Il Gop – Seven
  • Yeo Dul – Eight
  • Ah Hope – Nine
  • Yul – Ten
  • Soo Mool – Twenty
  • Sir Un – Thirty
  • Ma Heun – Forty
  • Sheen – Fifty
  • Ye Soon – Sixty
  • Il Hoon – Seventy
  • Yo Deun – Eighty
  • A Heun – Ninety
  • Back – Hundred
  • Chun – Thousand

Children Home Rules

  1. Children shall greet their parents when they enter the house and say goodbye when they leave.
  2. Children will at all times be respectful to their parents and grandparents.
  3. Children will at all times be truthful.
  4. Children shall strive for a good relationship with their brothers and sisters.
  5. Children will willingly help with the household chores.
  6. Children shall report to their parents that they have completed assigned tasks.
  7. Children shall be responsible for the upkeep and neatness of their own rooms.
  8. Children shall practice daily cleanliness in the matter of hair, teeth, and body.
  9. Children shall abide by their parents’ decisions.
  10. Children shall not interrupt adult conversations.
  11. Children shall refrain from rowdy behavior at home.
  12. Children shall possess an active mind, body, and spirit.
  13. Children will diligently study their schoolwork at home and at school.
  14. Children will at all times show respect for their school, teachers, and their peers.
  15. Children shall always finish what they have already started.

Adult Kicking Combinations

All kicks are done from a fighting stance. White belt through blue belt kicks are all done with the back foot first.

White Belts (Yellow Test)

  1. Inside Out Kick – Inside Out Kick – Middle Guarding Block
  2. Outside In Kick – Outside In Kick – Middle Guarding Block
  3. Front Snap Kick – Front Snap Kick – Middle Guarding Block
  4. Roundhouse Kick – Roundhouse Kick – Middle Guarding Block
  5. Side Kick – Side Kick – Middle Guarding Block
Yellow Belts (Green Tests)

  1. Front Snap Kick – Roundhouse Kick – Middle Guarding Block
  2. Roundhouse Kick – Spin Side Kick – Middle Guarding Block
  3. Spin Side Kick – Roundhouse Kick – Middle Guarding Block
  4. Roundhouse Kick – Switch Feet – Roundhouse Kick – Middle Guarding Block
  5. Side Kick – Step Side Kick – Middle Guarding Block
Green Belts (Blue Tests)

  1. Front Snap Kick – Roundhouse Kick – Spin Side Kick
  2. Roundhouse Kick – Spin Side Kick – Roundhouse Kick
  3. Spin Side Kick – Roundhouse Kick – Spin Side Kick
  4. Roundhouse Kick – Switch Feet – Roundhouse Kick – Turning Back Roundhouse Kick
  5. Side Kick – Step Side Kick – Spin Side Kick
Blue Belts (Brown Tests)

  1. Jump Front Snap Kick – Jump Roundhouse Kick – Jump Spin Side Kick
  2. Jump Roundhouse Kick – Jump Spin Side Kick – Jump Roundhouse Kick
  3. Jump Spin Side Kick – Jump Roundhouse Kick – Jump Spin Side Kick
  4. Jump Roundhouse Kick – Tornado Kick – Tornado Kick
  5. Jump Side Kick – Sliding Side Kick – Jump Spin Side Kick
Brown and Red Belts (Red & Black Tests)

  1. Front Foot Double Round House Kick – Double Side Kick – Jump Spin Side Kick
  2. Hook Kick – Double Side Kick – Jump Spin Side Kick
  3. Double Roundhouse Kick – Hook Kick – Jump Spin Side Kick
  4. Switchfoot Double Roundhouse Kick – Jump Spin Side Kick – Jump Spin Side Kick
  5. Back Foot Crescent Kick – Tornado Crescent Kick – Spinning Heel Kick
Cho Dan Bo

  1. Front Foot Jump Hook Kick – Jump Spin Side Kick – Jump Spin Side Kick
  2. Front Foot Jump Roundhouse Kick – Jump Axe Kick – Jump Spin Side Kick
  3. Back Foot Jump Roundhouse Kick – Tornado Kick – Double Roundhouse Kick
  4. Back Foot Jump Roundhouse Kick – Tornado Kick – Tornado Kick – Tornado Kick
  5. Back Foot Jump Roundhouse Kick – Tornado Roundhouse Kick – Low Spinning Heel Kick – Middle Spinning Heel Kick – Jump High Spinning Heel Kick

Interpretation of Patterns (Forms)

Cho-Ji: Means literally the “Heaven the Earth”. It is in the Orient, interpreted as the creation of the world or the beginning of human history. Therefore, it is the initial pattern played by the beginner. This pattern consists of two similar parts: one to represent the Heaven and the other, the Earth. (19 movements)
Dan-Gun: Is named after the holy Dan-Gun, the legendary founder of Korea in the year of 2333 B.C. (21 movements)
Do-San: Is the pseudonym of the patriot Ahn Ch’ang-Ho (1876-1938) who devoted his entire life to furthering the education of Korea and its independence movement (24 movements)
Won-Hyo: Won HYO was the noted monk of the Silla Dynasty who secularized Buddhism by making Buddhist doctrine understandable to the people. He died in the year of 686 A.D. (28 movements)
Yul-Gok: Is the pseudonym of a great philosopher and scholar, Yi I. (1584 A.D.) Nickname the “Confucius of Korea”. The 38 movements of this pattern refer to birthplace on the 38 latitude and the diagram represents “scholar”.
Joon-Gun: Joon Gun (Pronounced as “joong goon) is named after the patriot Ann Joong Gun who executed the first Japanese governor-general (who played the leading role in Korea Japan Annexation in 1910) when he entered his strategic zone in Manchuria. The 32 movements represent Mr. Ahn’s age when he was killed by Japanese in 1910 (32 movements)
Toi-Gye: Is the pen name of the noted scholar, Yi Hwang, (16th A.D.), an authority on neo-confucianism. The 37 movements of the pattern refer to his birthplace on 37 latitude, the diagram represents “scholar”.
Hwa-Rang: Is named after the Hwa-Rang youth group, which originated in the Silla Dynasty about 1350 years ago. This group eventually became the actual driving force for the unification of the three Kingdoms of Korea. (29 movements)
Choong-Moo: Was the given name to the great Admiral Yi Sun-Sin of the Yi Dynasty. He was reputed to have invented the first armoured battleship (Kobukson) which was the precursor of the present day submarine in 1592 A.D. The reason why this pattern ends up with the left hand attack is to symbolize his regrettable death having no chance to show his unrestrained potentiality check by the forced reservation of his loyalty to the king. (30 movements)
Koryo: Koryo is the name of an ancient dynasty in the Korean peninsula. The English name of “Korea” is originated from the name of the “Koryo” Dynasty, which was famed for, is cultural achievements such as Koryo ceramic and for the valiant spirit of its people with which they defeated the Mongolians’ aggressions.
Kwang-Nae: Is picked after the famous Gwang-Gae T’o-Wang, the 19th King of the Koguryo Dynasty, who regained all the lost territories including the greater part of Manchuria. The diagram (±) represents the expansion and recovery of lost territory. The 39 movements refer to his reign for 39 years.
Kumgang: The word “Kumgang” has originally the meaning of being too strong to be broken. Also in Budhism, what can break off every agony of mind with a combination of wisdom of virtue is called “kumgang.” The Poomse “kumgamg” is named after Mount Kumgang, symbol of solidity. “Kumgang” is also analogous to “diamond.”
Poe-Eun: Is the pseudonym of a loyal subject Chong Mong-Chu (1400 A.D.) who was a famous poet and whose poem “I would not serve a second master though I might be crucified a hundred times” is known to every Korean. He was also a pioneer in the field of physics. The diagram (-) represents his unerring loyalty to the king and country towards the end of the Koryo Dynasty.
Taeback: “Taeback” is the ancient name of Mount Paekdu where the legendary Tangun founded a nation for the first time in the Korean peninsula some 4,300 years ago. Poomse “Taeback” takes its principles of movement from the word “Taeback” which means being looked up to as sacred.
Ge-Baek: Is named after Ge-Baek, a great general in the Baek Je Dynasty (660 A.D.). The diagram (l) represents his severe and strict military discipline.
Choong-Jang: Is the pseudonym given to General Kim Duk Ryang who lived during the Yi Dynasty, fifteenth century. This pattern ends with a left-hand attack to symbolize the tragedy of his death at 27 in prison before he was able to reach full maturity.